Final Project – Yale Electric

yale electric

Focus
A branding video (1-2 minutes) that will live on the company’s website is being suggested for local electrical distributor, Yale Electric Supply Company. Since the company does not boast a social media presence at this time and does not have the budget to purchase advertising, an email featuring the video will be shared with current and past customers using the company’s database.

Issues
Yale Electric Supply started as a mom-and-pop store in the 1940s, but today boasts 10 stores in Central Pennsylvania that sell lights, panel boxes, breakers, conduit, fixtures and wire. The company, with about 300 employees, serves both residential and commercial customers; however, 70 percent of its business is commercially focused.

Audience
Primary clients are commercial electricians who work in Central Pennsylvania on warehouses, new home construction and renovations, businesses and garages. These customers buy a wide range of electrical products in varying quantities, based on their project needs.

Content
Price and service are key. Yale’s team has the ability – and flexibility – to customize prices and products/services to meet client needs.

Brand
Super Service. For more than 70 years, the company has been focused on the relationships it shares with its customers, delivering exceptional service and competitive prices.

Creative Approach
 This two-minute branding video for Yale Electric Supply uses a creation myth to convey the brands content points. It tells the story of Yale Electric’s founder – Yale Evelev – and focuses on his evolving desire to help others harness a super power – electricity. From his dream of being a super hero as a child to becoming the owner of a business focused on super service, Yale Evelev always knew that helping others is what really matters most. And that’s why his company, Yale Electric, has been around for more than 70 years.

Yale Electric: “Super Service” 1 minute

VIDEO AUDIO
 1. INT. – DINING ROOM – DAY
Wide Shot (WS) Three-year old boy, YALE, watches dad changing out a light switch.
VO: Yale Evelev always wanted to be a super hero.
 2. INT. – KITCHEN – DAY
Medium Shot (MS) of Yale as he watches his dad install an overhead light.
VO: At the age of three, Yale believed he had a super power – the ability to harness electricity. 

 

 3. INT. – KITCHEN – NIGHT
MS from behind of Yale in kitchen pointing at ceiling light once and it comes on; again and it goes off. He is wearing his dad’s blue sweatshirt with the word “Superconductor” written on it in marker.
VO: Yale would move through his house, turning lights on and off by simply pointing. 
 4. INT. – LIVING ROOM – NIGHT
WS of Yale’s dad turning light switch on and off behind a dirtied Yale, who is pointing at an end table lamp.
VO: Or so he thought…
 5. FOUR YEARS LATER
INT. – LIVING ROOM – DAY
MS of seven-year-old Yale catching his father turning the light switch on and off.
VO: In time, Yale realized he didn’t have a super power…but his interest in electricity never dimmed.
 6. MS of a children’s TV show about static electricity – showing how touching a cat and then someone else can shock them. Scene is dirtied by Yale watching TV. Sounds of the TV show in the background.
 7. MS of Yale walking up behind his mother, touching her and shocking her. She jumps; Yale smiles. Sound of static shock. Mother gasps.
 8. EIGHT YEARS LATER
INT. – YALE’S BEDROOM – NIGHT
Close up (CU) teenage Yale reading “Electricity as a Super Power.”
VO: As a teenager, Yale started studying how electricity could help others. 
 9. INT. – HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA – NIGHT
MS of teenage Yale posing for a photo. He is smiling broadly, holding a blue ribbon and standing beside his electrical experiment. Camera flash goes off.
VO: He won several blue ribbons for his science fair projects, further lighting his passion for electricity.
 10. FOUR YEARS LATER
INT. – DAY – TRADE SCHOOL CLASSROOM
WS of Yale seated at a table with other electricians while instructor maps out electrical current information.
VO: After graduation, Yale became an electrician apprentice, so he could help others light their homes. 
 11. ONE YEAR LATER
INT. – DAY – IN A CUSTOMER’S HOUSE
CU of Yale getting a decent jolt of electricity as he installs a lighting fixture.
VO: Here, he learned that four things could stop this from happening…unavailable parts, high prices, poor customer service and…forgetting to shut the power off.
 12. FIVE YEARS LATER – 1940
INT. – YALE ELECTRIC STORE – DAY WS
of Yale, wearing a blue and gray company shirt, behind the counter looking at an electrical fixture with a customer.
VO: It was this shocking realization that led him to create Yale Electric. For Yale, there was no job too small, or part too hard to find, and he became known for flexible pricing, custom orders and hard to find parts.
 13. TODAY
INT. – YALE ELECTRIC STORE – DAY
WS of the stores counter with a photo of Yale on the wall in the background. The photo shows Yale standing outside the store when it first opened. Workers in updated gray and blue company shirts pass by the photo periodically as they work behind the counter on customer orders.
VO: A lot of changes have occurred in the electrical industry over the past 70 years, but today Yale’s dream carries on…
 14. Grey screenBlue font: Yale Electric Supply Serving the community since 1940 VO: As well as his understanding that a true super hero is someone who is simply willing to help others.

 

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Creative Approach and Script First Draft – Yale Electric

Creative Approach: This two-minute branding video for Yale Electric Supply uses a creation myth to convey the brand’s content points — price and service. It tells the story of Yale Electric’s founder – Yale Evelev – and focuses on his evolving desire to help others harness a super power – electricity. From his dreams as a child of being a super hero to the owner of a business focused on super service, Yale Evelev always knew that helping others is what really matters most. And that’s why his company, Yale Electric, has been around for more than 70 years.

Yale Electric: “Super Service”
2 minutes

VIDEO AUDIO
 1. INT. – DINING ROOM – DAY
Wide Shot (WS) Three-year old boy, YALE, watches dad changing out a light switch.
VO: Yale Evelev always wanted to be a super hero.
 2. INT. – KITCHEN – DAY
Medium Shot (MS) of Yale as he watches his dad install an overhead light.
VO: At the age of three, Yale believed he had a super power – the ability to harness electricity.
 3. INT. – KITCHEN – NIGHT
MS from behind of Yale in kitchen pointing at ceiling light once and it comes on; again and it goes off. He is wearing his dad’s blue sweatshirt with the word “Superconductor” written on it in marker.
VO: Yale would move through the house, wearing his father’s old blue sweatshirt as a cape, turning lights on and off by simply pointing his finger.
 4. INT. – LIVING ROOM – NIGHT
WS of Yale wearing sweatshirt in living room pointing at end table lamp as it comes on and off, with dad, dirtied, in background flipping light switches.
VO: Or so he thought…
 5. FOUR YEARS LATER
INT. – LIVING ROOM – DAY
MS of seven-year-old Yale catching his father turning the light switch on and off.
VO: In time, Yale realized he really didn’t have a super power…but his interest in electricity never dimmed.
 6. MS of a children’s TV show about static electricity – showing how touching a cat and then someone else can shock them. Scene is dirtied by Yale watching TV. Sounds of the TV show in the background.YALE: Wow! That is so cool!
 7. MS of Yale walking up behind his mother, touching her and shocking her. She jumps; Yale smiles. Sound of statics shock. Mother gasps.
 8. EIGHT YEARS LATER
INT. – YALE’S BEDROOM – NIGHT
Close up (CU) teenage Yale reading “Electricity as a Super Power.”
VO: As a teenager, Yale started learning as much as he could about electricity… and how it could help others.
 9. INT. – HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA – NIGHT
MS of teenage Yale posing for a photo. He is smiling broadly, holding a blue ribbon and standing beside his electrical experiment. Camera flash goes off.
VO: His science fair experiments won him several blue ribbons, further lighting his passion for electricity.
 10. FOUR YEARS LATER
INT. – DAY – TRADE SCHOOL CLASSROOM
WS of Yale seated at a table with other electricians while instructor maps out electrical current information.
VO: After graduation, Yale became an electrician apprentice, so he could help people use electricity to cook, heat and cool, and light their homes.
 11. ONE YEAR LATER
INT. – DAY – IN A CUSTOMER’S HOUSE
CU of Yale getting a decent jolt of electricity as he installs a lighting fixture.
VO: It was during this time, that he learned three – well actually four – key things could get in his way of helping customers: unavailable parts, high prices, poor customer service and…forgetting to shut the power off.YALE out loud, but to himself: Well, I won’t forget to do that again, will I?!
 12. FIVE YEARS LATER
INT. – YALE ELECTRIC STORE – DAY
WS of Yale, wearing a blue and gray company shirt, behind the counter looking at an electrical fixture with a customer.
VO: It was this shocking realization and his desire to help other electricians that led to the creation of Yale Electric in 1940.For Yale, there was no job too small, or part too hard to find, and he came known by local electricians for his “super service.”He provided his customer with the flexible pricing, custom orders and hard to find parts they needed to harness what was once Yale’s super power.
 13. TODAY
INT. – YALE ELECTRIC STORE – DAY
WS of the expanded store with several workers in gray and blue company shirts working behind the counter and waiting on several customers.
VO: A lot of changes have occurred in the electrical industry since Yale first opened his company more than 70 years ago, but today the business carries on his vision…
 14. Grey screen
Blue font: Yale Electric Supply
Serving the community since 1940
VO: That being a super hero doesn’t necessarily mean you have to be a real super hero. You simply have to be willing to help others.

Paper Edit – U.S. Army

 We Are Family

 

  Video Audio
 1. EXT. – ARMY BASE – DAY

Wide Shot (WS) of soldiers marching

Sounds of the soldiers marching, commanders calling out marching commands.
 2. INT. – ARMY BARRACKS – DAY

WS of CPT Y standing in front of bunk beds, looking slightly off camera, as if speaking to another person.

CPT Y: Most soldiers like to keep their own problems personal.
 3. MS of CPT Y and CPT Z talking to each other in the barracks. CPT Z: I think that’s part of the Army mentality; that you don’t want to ask for help…you know, “I’m a man. I’m in the Army. I don’t need help.” I think it’s important that we recognize those soldiers that need help and try to break that barrier and let them know it’s okay to come forward and ask for the help that the Army can provide them.
 4. INT. – CPT Y’S HOME – NIGHT

CPT Y playing a board game with his wife and kids in family room

CPT Y: As Commanders, we live for our soldiers as we do our own families…when they do need help…soldiers need to see you’re human also. I may be a Commander, but I’m a man, I’m a husband, I’m a father, and I’ve made my fair share of mistakes… At the same time, somebody was always there to help me. So as much as possible, you want to open up all avenues to help every soldier possible.
 5. BACK TO BARRACKS

Close UP (CU) of CPT Z

CPT Z: And you don’t always have to talk to them from a Commander to a subordinate standpoint. You just talk to them man-to-man, and you learn a lot from your soldiers when you do that.
 6. MS of CPT Y CPT Y: Soldiers are the heartbeat; they’re the pulse and they’re the tempo of that unit.  And if that tends to skip a beat, it’s going to show…and keeping that team healthy is most important. If one soldier is hurting, his friends are going to know about it.
 7. MS of CPT Z and CPT Y standing together looking directly at camera CPT Z: Once they ask for help, or you get them to admit they need help… it gets easier from there.CPT Y: It’s also a domino effect. Once one soldier receives help, he’s willing to help another solider. It becomes contagious.
 8. INT. – UNIT EXERCISE – DAY

CPT Z overseeing unit activity, dirtied by soldiers doing activity in background

CPT Z: And that is just absolutely crucial. We have the support of our family at home, but our unit is a family. And when one of them is in trouble, we all come to their aid. And that’s how we make sure everybody is taken care of.
 9. INT. – CPT Y’S HOME BEDROOM – DAY

CPT Y buttons uniform and puts on hat, standing in front of mirror.

CPT Y: It’s just a culture that once you put this uniform on, that you’re part of a family. That culture is one that spreads and you’ll never read about it. You’ll never see it. And it’s a grand scheme of taking care of each other, leaving no man behind and that your part – your small part of the Army is taking care of your family.
 10. BACK TO BARRACKS

CU of CPT Z

CPT Z: And that saying, leave no man behind, it doesn’t just refer to when you’re on the battlefield. It refers to just as much when you’re back here at home station and your soldier needs help. You just don’t leave him out there on his own. You bring him in and you take care of him…
 11. WS of CPT Y and CPTZ talking to each other I’ve never seen a unit come together more than when a soldier or a soldier’s family needs help. And that’s one of the great things about being in the Army…there’s no such word as no when it comes to helping the family.CPT Y: The essence of family is not just mother, child, husband, wife and their children…You have so many different conglomerates of what we call family. And…
 12. White Background
U.S. Army Logo (White, Black and Yellow) Black Font: We are Family
a soldier is no good without his family.

Reverse-Engineered Shooting Scripts: Lays and Cheerios

Lays – “Mrs. Potato Head”

  Video Audio
 1. INT. – DOOR/HALLWAY – AFTERNOON
Wide Shot (WS) of MR. POTATO HEAD standing inside slightly open front door, hangs hat.
Whistling
Faint sounds of birds; then of door closing in background
 2. WS of Mr. Potato Head as he puts on wig, adjusts it and looks around. MR. POTATO HEAD: Sweetie, I’m home.
 3. INT. – LIVING ROOM
WS of Mr. Potato Head looking around, a bit confused.
Crunching sound
Music continues through most of 8
 4. INT. – KITCHEN
WS of Mr. Potato Head looking at pot boiling on stove then pantry door; now completely confused.
Crunching sound
MR. POTATO HEAD: Hello.
 5. INT. – DOORWAY/PANTRY
Medium Shot (MS) of Mr. Potato Head entering pantry and reacting as if caught off guard.
Creaking door
Crunching sound
MR. POTATO HEAD: Sweetie.
 6. Close Up (CU) of Mrs. Potato Head’s fingers pulling a chip out of a bag of Lays. MRS. POTATO HEAD: Mmmm.
 7. CU of Mrs. Potato Head raising chip toward mouth.
 8. WS of Mrs. Potato Head with chip in one hand, going for her mouth, and bag of Classic Lays in the other, as she turns and looks at Mr. Potato Head and gasps. One loud crunch
MRS. POTATO HEAD: Oh.
Music stops abruptly
 9. MS of Mr. Potato Head, who appears stunned. MR. POTATO HEAD: But you’re a potato.
 10. MS of Mrs. Potato Head holding Lays Classic bag in one hand and chip in other, looks at chip and eats it. VO: The light crispy taste of Lays potato chips…
MRS. POTATO HEAD: Mmmm.
Crunching sound
Music through 13
 11. Yellow background
Red font: one taste and you’re in love
Classic Lay’s bag as chips go into bag
VO: one taste and you’re in love.
 12. WS of Mrs. Potato Head getting ready to feed chip to Mr. Potato Head. MR. POTATO HEAD: Our little secret, okay.
 13. WS of Mrs. Potato Head feeding Mr. Potato Head a chip. MRS. POTATO HEAD: Hmmm mmmm.
Crunching and laughter

Cheerios – “Gracie”

  Video Audio
 1. INT. – KITCHEN/BREAKFAST TABLE – DAY
Wide Shot (WS) shot of father and young daughter at breakfast table eating Cheerios with mom in foreground.
Short clip of music
 2. Father pulls Cheerios out of bowl and places them on table. FATHER: Hey Gracie.
 3. Father pushes a single piece of cereal off by itself. You know how our family has daddy…
 4. Close Up (CU) of father’s finger adding a second piece of cereal to the one by itself. And mommy
 5. Medium Shot (MS) of GRACIE who gasps.
 6. CU of Gracie’s finger adding a third piece of cereal to the two pieces. GRACIE: And me
FATHER: Yeah, that’s right
 7. MS of Mom watching. Pretty soon…
 8. WS of full family, showing mom’s baby bump. You’re gonna have a baby brother.
 9. CU of Gracie’s frowning, then smirking face.
 10. CU of the father’s confused face.
 11. CU of Gracie’s finger as she adds a fifth piece of cereal. GRACIE: And…
 12. MS of Gracie as she pulls her pointer finger up and back from the table. She appears to be precocious. a puppy.
 13. WS of Gracie and father who looks at Mom. FATHER: Deal.
 14. MS of Mom in kitchen who appears caught off guard.
 15. Yellow background
Black font: Love
(and a single Cheerio as a period).
Music plays

References

YouTube. (2014, Jan. 28). Cheerios 2014 game day ad: “Gracie”. Retrieved April 19, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKuQrKeGe6g

YouTube. (2014, Feb. 11). Lays commercial ‘Mrs Potatohead’: Frito Lay ad 2014, funny ads. Retrieved April 19, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtidofBVYDY

Final Focus and Yale Electric: Branding Video Concepts

Before you can make a great branding video, you need to really understand the brand and its target audience. As P.I. Reed (Lesson 5, 2014, para. 21) explains:

In a branding video, where the brand is so often in the background and seems almost besides the point, the connection between it and the movie is even more tenuous than in a commercial.

Last week I spoke with two local businesses in Central Pennsylvania — Final Focus Productions and Yale Electric Supply. The following “concept papers” are the result of those discussions:

final focus

Focus
Final Focus Productions wants a branding video (2-3 minutes) about its business that will live on the company’s YouTube channel and be launched via its website, Facebook and LinkedIn accounts.

Issues
Final Focus Productions is a sole proprietorship that opened in 1991 in the third bedroom of the owner’s house. The majority (95 percent) of the owner’s business is repeat or comes from referrals. The brand’s negative – sole proprietorship – is also what sets it apart from the competition: While the company can deliver all of the same services offered by larger firms using a pool of qualified freelancers, prospects unfamiliar with the business often believe it cannot.

Audience
Primary clients are advertising, marketing and communications professionals and agencies in Central Pennsylvania who are looking for innovative, traditional and non-traditional ways to promote their brands using video and audio.

Content
Bigger isn’t always better.
Final Focus can “right-size” each project.
The company can provide brands with access to the same creative services available at larger firms, while only having to pay for the services they want/need.

Brand
Creative Value. Final Focus Productions understands marketing and branding. The company is focused on delivering innovative, cost-effective video and audio work that helps break through the clutter to communicate a brand’s essence to its desired audience.

yale electric

Focus
A branding video (2-3 minutes) that will live on the company’s website is being suggested for local electrical distributor, Yale Electric Supply Company. Since the company does not boast a social media presence at this time, an email featuring the video will be shared with current and past customers using the company’s database.

Issues
Yale Electric Supply started as a mom-and-pop store in the 1940s, but today boasts 10 stores in Central Pennsylvania that sell lights, panel boxes, breakers, conduit, fixtures and wire. The company, with about 300 employees, serves both residential and commercial customers; however, 70 percent of its business is commercially focused.

Audience
Primary clients are commercial electricians who work in Central Pennsylvania on warehouses, new home construction and renovations, businesses and garages. These customers buy a wide range of electrical products in varying quantities, based on their project needs.

Content
Price and service are key.
Yale’s team has the ability – and flexibility – to customize prices and products/services to meet client needs.
Yale’s customers think they can buy the same quality products – and get the same quality of service – at box stores, like Lowe’s and Home Depot, for a lower price.

Brand
Super Service. For more than 70 years, the company has been focused on the relationships it shares with its customers, delivering exceptional service and competitive prices.

References

Final Focus Productions. (2014). Retrieved March 24, 2014, from http://www.trustffp.com/

Kownacki, S. (2014, March 24). Over-the-phone interview with Final Focus owner.

Lerew, D. (2014, March 20). Over-the-phone interview with Yale Electric’s commercial lighting project manager.

Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism, West Virginia University. (2014). Lesson 5: Digital Storytelling. Retrieved April 7, 2014, from WVU eCampus Web site: http://ecampus.wvu.edu

Yale Electric Supply. (n.d.). Home. Retrieved March 23, 2014, from http://www.yaleelectricsupply.com/

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The Hero in All of Us

Harrisburg-born singer, songwriter and musician Jeffrey Gaines croons, “There’s got to be some hero in me” in his first single from his 1992 debut album, Jeffrey Gaines. This sentiment from Gaines does an exemplary job of summing up the idea that the best stories – and storytellers – are those who can turn their audiences into heroes.

As P.I. Reed (Lesson 2, 2014) points out, the word “story” has several meanings. And while each story uses a “character,” or characters, to communicate to its intended audience, what makes a story truly effective is when the audience takes some type of heroic action or undergoes a heroic transformation.

Here are three commercials that I believe demonstrate this idea – and do it exceptionally well:

God Made a Farmer

I remember the first time I saw this long-form ad, which really is a branding video that aired as a commercial during last year’s Super Bowl. I was at a party with a group of friends I don’t get to see very often so you can imagine the atmosphere: lots of talking, joking and laughing. But when this spot came on, every single one of us got quiet and watched. Not a word was uttered until it was over – and the first words were an astute observation by Katy, who said: “Did anyone notice how we all shut up when this came on? Wow! That was a good commercial!” We then proceeded to talk about the fact that none of us knew this was for the Dodge Ram until the very end – even though the truck makes a brief appearance at one point in the ad.

The story behind this ad is that God made a caretaker for the Earth on the 8th day. This caretaker is in the form of a farmer: Someone who works work hard and long hours for family, community and country; who rises above adversity and loss, and tries again, and again, and again. A man or woman who creates with his or her hands; is strong, sensitive and caring; and feels a connectedness with the world, its people and its creatures. A person who leaves and shapes a legacy that makes this place – and the people and creatures in it – better for his or her having been a part of it. The ad ends showing the Dodge Ram truck in fully glory with a tribute to the farmer, or hero, in all of us.

Each time I watch this ad, I am impressed by the strategy Dodge chose for it. Specifically, the selection of Paul Harvey’s “God Made a Farmer” and the company’s choice to not focus on the product, but instead the message. I am a big fan of selling a product without selling the product. The simple brand positioning that Dodge leaves me with after watching this ad is best summed up by this: Beautifully Tough. How would you describe the brand after viewing this spot?

GoPro: Red Bull Stratos

Anyone that really knows me understands I’m deathly afraid of heights. I might be a formidable force in the boardroom or when playing sports, but when it comes to flying in airplanes, climbing lookout towers, or riding in skyscraper elevators, I go weak at the knees. This 30-second spot from GoPro, which aired in the 2014 Super Bowl, captures a courageous hero in action – a man by the name of Felix Baumgartner who jumps out of a “space station” 24.5 miles above the Earth. Oremus (2014, para. 2) brings Baumgartner’s courage to the forefront when talking about footage from a longer video of the jump:

Ahead of a 30-second Super Bowl spot, GoPro has released an extended eight-minute video culled from its first-person footage of the record-setting fall. It’s both mesmerizing and stomach-turning to watch from Baumgartner’s perspective as the world spins like an out-of-control top during the most harrowing portion of his descent.

Even though the 30-second spot doesn’t contain the footage Oremus references, you still have to be amazed at this man’s daring feat. In the short spot, he jumps off a platform and simply falls.When you’re afraid of heights like me, the courage it takes to do something like this is truly incomprehensible and impressive! 

As you can see by GoPro’s tagline (before and after the actual spot), the brand’s strategy is to align itself with the concept of being a “hero,” which is a good fit in my mind when you think about the product the brand is marketing. Anyone of us can be a hero – whether we’re saving a kitten, riding a mountain bike on rugged trails, or jumping out of a space station. To me, the positioning associated with this spot – and the GoPro brand – is this: Everyday Heroes. Thoughts on GoPro and the video I shared?

Budweiser “Puppy Love”

It shouldn’t be surprising that I picked Budweiser’s 2014 Super Bowl commercial as my third example, given my expressed love of animals. This one-minute spot leaves me feeling as warm and fuzzy as the puppy in the commercial! And while Bud is not my beer of choice, I still have some really good feelings about this brand.

Basically, this spot is about a puppy who is being raised on a farm next to where the Budweiser Clydesdales live. The puppy visits the neighboring farm and forms a strong bond with one of the horses. The puppy visits the horse regularly and is returned to his breeder regularly. The big day comes – the puppy gets adopted. As the puppy is leaving, he starts crying for his buddy. The horse hears him and chases after his pal to stop his departure. The horse’s friends, in turn, offer their assistance, helping their friend halt the puppy’s exit. The two pals are reunited – and it looks like forever!

This commercial uses the song, “Let Her Go,” by Passenger to help tell this story and evoke specific emotions rather successfully. This approach ties perfectly with Bud’s strategy, which is to align its brand with feelings of family, friends and loyalty. From supporting our dedicated and loyal troops to the grand stature of the Clydesdales, Bud paints us a story of the human spirit – a spirit that is connected to others (people and creatures) and all the warmth that comes from such connectedness. It is through our attachment to others that we become the heroes Bud wants us to be.

In my mind, Bud’s brand positioning is:  Forever Family/Friends. Anyone want to weigh-in on what positioning they believe Bud is communicating about its brand through this commercial?

Finding our “Hero”

Clearly, Bud, GoPro and Dodge are challenging each of us to find the hero that exists within us – in whatever way it manifests. As P.I. Reed (2014, para. 32) explains:

It’s called transformation. By the story’s end the character may be older but wiser, embittered, fulfilled, redeemed, condemned, or some combination thereof. He or she has undergone a profound change.

References

Oremus, W. (2014, Jan. 31). What it’s really like to free-fall from a space capsule. Retrieved March 22, 2014, from http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2014/01/31/felix_baumgartner_red_bull_space_jump_first_person_gopro_video.html

Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism, West Virginia University. (2014). Lesson 2: Digital Storytelling. Retrieved March 17, 2014, from WVU eCampus Web site: http://ecampus.wvu.edu

YouTube. (2013, Feb. 13). Official Ram trucks Super Bowl commercial “Farmer.” Retrieved March 22, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMpZ0TGjbWE

YouTube. (2013). GoPro: . Retrieved March 22, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjB_oVeq8Lo

YouTube. (2014, Jan. 29). Budweiser Super Bowl XLVIII commercial — “Puppy love.” Retrieved March 22, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQB7QRyF4p4